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Winning and Losing

For any business, being able to retain customers is one thing but understanding why you weren’t able to conquer the ones that didn’t make the purchase is just as important.

From my years of experience conducting market research, many companies seem to focus solely on business they do have (which is great) but forget about the sales they should have made but didn’t.

I have devised a simple and practical, yet effective, do-it-yourself market research strategy which any business can implement in-house. It’s called the Win/Loss Analysis and forms the first chapter in our series, Market Research Made Easy (watch this space!).

Understanding why customers didn’t choose you but someone else is central to this analysis. When you’re asking the ‘ones that got away’ as well as your usual customer base, you are essentially combining a competitor analysis, a customer satisfaction survey, your company’s own brand perception among your customers, and at the same time highlighting areas of the business which require much needed improvement.

How did the idea of the “win/loss analysis” originate?

  • After having worked with numerous clients over the years, we found ourselves talking to their customers about not only what worked well for them but also what didn’t work well for them.
  • We then translated this into asking lost sales (i.e. people who obtained quotes or made an enquiry but didn’t proceed with a purchase) why we didn’t win their business
  • The analysis from these two groups then presents significant opportunities for companies to improve operations at all levels.

Why ‘winning’ and ‘losing’?

  • It’s very simple: we needed to examine the differences between getting the sale (winning) and not getting the sale (losing).

What are some of the key outcomes of the analysis?

  • This process can pick up significant issues; for instance the importance of inventory control or a company’s ability to provide the right training to deliver their product or service, or any problems relating to the sales function such as quote turnaround times etc.
  • Companies can also identify and communicate the how and what of their competitive advantage and unique selling proposition (USP).
  • And, just as important, it can identify operational issues such as service protocols and make sure they match customers’ expectations.

What are some the things to consider when doing your own Win/Loss Analysis?

  • Don’t be afraid to ask your customers tough questions (e.g. what did we get wrong or what can we do better for you?).
  • Make sure your questionnaires are consistent; it is important to use the same questionnaire for your customers so you can compare the results.
  • You don’t have to ask many of your customers or lost sales; 10 in each group is usually enough.
  • Make sure the questions are relevant to your customers and you are prepared to make changes based on those findings; good or bad.
  • Let your customers know what changes you plan to implement in your company, product, or service offering in response to their answers. This can translate into more customer loyalty.
  • Don’t let your ego get in the way; it’s not about you … it’s about your company and, importantly, your customers.
  • Once the analysis is done, be sure to follow-up any changes and measure how effective those changes are with your customers. Do this over regular intervals.

Don’t wait.
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Aged Care – A Critical Analysis

We have seen an exponential increase in the number of elderly in proportion to the total population over the past decades. However, people aged 65 and over are not as healthy in old age as projected considering our prosperity, according to recent findings of an international study done by BDO in cooperation with the OECD.

Additionally, elderly and healthcare costs are continuously increasing especially due to an international increase in comorbidity (two or more illnesses are present in the same person simultaneously) among those aged 65 and over, placing a heavy social and economic burden on future generations.

Average medical expenses for a person aged 85 and over amount to over AUD$79,200 per year (BDO); an alarming amount considering that this group is expected to exceed 25% by 2050 worldwide.

Furthermore, due to high educational requirements, the demand for health care professionals far outstrips the supply. What’s more is, many lower-skilled health care professionals were made redundant in the last years, due to unnecessarily high requirements.

Analysing national differences in their approach to aged care revealed extraordinary insights in BDO’s recent international study.

Even though all examined countries were faced with tremendous demographic challenges, the study found that not only differences in health care models and funding seemed to impact the health of the elderly, but lifestyle and habits too. In Norway, for example, people are healthier for a significantly longer period of time due to an outdoor lifestyle, a ‘culture of caring’, with families taking care of each other and the elderly taking an active and meaningful part in society

Furthermore, smokers made up only 4% of the population, whereas in Germany, where elderly (on average) only have 8 healthy years over 65, 20% of the population smoked.

A different approach to evaluating return on investment (ROI) in the Netherlands is showing positive results. The country seeks to shift their focus away from the disabilities of patients and further towards their abilities.

BDO concluded that current healthcare systems focus on curing the sick rather than preventing sickness and does not deal with the root of the problem.

To achieve a more affordable, more effective and sustainable aged care system we need to:

  1. focus on innovation, prevention and rehabilitation;
  2. target funding to boost innovation;
  3. lower educational barriers for health care professionals;
  4. develop technical innovations;
  5. encourage and support big-scale lifestyle changes;
  6. invest in methods, solutions and processes that ensure people age differently;
  7. seeking greater dialogue with the elderly to identify areas of improvement;
  8. evaluate ROI;
  9. acknowledge lack of difference between private and public healthcare systems; and
  10. give the elderly a place and purpose in our society.

Source: https://www.bdo.com.au/en-au/insights/healthcare/publications/new-perspectives-on-elderly-care

Win/Loss Analysis: Sustainable Growth

All business strive for continuous success and growth and in the early stages of business development, this might be easy to achieve. However, the more established a business becomes, the more difficult it becomes to improve on last year’s results.

The key to continuous growth is insight-driven continuous refinement.

Perception is Reality

Conducting a win/loss analysis is one of the easiest and most cost-effective ways to improve and refine your marketing, communications, sales and business strategies. It is also one of the most important analyses, as your customers’ perception will be directly reflected in your sales.

 

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It simply involves interviewing of 10 to 15 customers within 3 months of their purchase and, more importantly, the same amount for “lost sales”. “Lost sales” are those who enquired about the company’s service or product but failed to proceed to make a purchase. These interviews prove most successful when conducted by an independent third party, as conflicts of interest are avoided, and customers openly give more direct and honest feedback about their experiences with their purchase.

Analysing the gathered feedback will not only give the business a deeper understanding of consumer buying behaviour and its (potential) pain-points, but will also enable the business to benchmark themselves against their competitors and other key industry players. It may even uncover potentially new and successful products or services that customers have always wanted!

This will allow for a strategic and informed refinement of the business’ unique selling proposition (USP), but also act as an early warning system, indicating the need for a product or service to be improved before sales are disrupted.

The processing and analysis of results will enable the business to develop meaningful and strategic recommendations, allowing decision makers of all kinds to make better decisions in their businesses.

Promptly implementing the changes and improvements from the analysis will increase overall effectiveness and put you on the path to success.

Remember, that customer perception is what will make or break your business, especially when we compete globally for the same dollar.

Businesses (and their owners) that want to stay on the trajectory of continuous growth, should dedicate itself to a continuous refinement process, backed by timely win/loss analyses (e.g. monthly or quarterly).

Download now: How to optimise your customer acquisition and retention strategies.